On Showering the World with Kindness

Being kind is something that we’re taught early on. We’re taught how to share our things. We’re taught how to put ourselves in other people’s shoes so that we can better understand them.

But it’s often easy to forget to nurture kindness in ourself and in our interactions with others. Being kind takes practice and willingness. To shower the world with kindness means to embrace the language, attitude, and value of kindness.


The Language of Kindness

Surround yourself with words of kindness about yourself, others, and the world. The language of kindness starts within yourself. If you fail, if you struggle, if things are not going your way, you get to choose the story you tell yourself about the failures and struggles.

Look at your experiences with compassion and cheer yourself on. On the days when you keep thinking that you could have done better, don’t let your overthinking get the best of you. When you consistently use the language of kindness on yourself, it’s easier to express kindness to the world. 

Surround yourself with the language of kindness and make sure that it’s always available to you. From the books you read to the social media accounts that you follow to the screensaver on your phone.

The Attitude of Kindness

Your attitude about how you perceive situations matters. Choose the attitude that aligns with kindness. When you align your attitude with kindness, it shows in your actions as well. You begin to see the places in the world that could use some light, help, and healing. It’s easier to find solutions to problems when kindness is present because everyone is willing to help each other out. 

Sometimes choosing kindness means that you don’t take things personally, and you see someone else’s actions or words with compassion, because at the root of it, we’re all looking for a world that reflects warmth.

The Core Value of Kindness 

Choosing kindness as a life value means that you are aware in what areas of your life you can practice more kindness. You’re in constant reflection within yourself on your areas of weakness and strength.

Where in your life can you practice more kindness? Showing more kindness can mean being kinder to yourself in your thoughts. Or showing up with kindness to the people who have hurt you.

Has anybody ever told you? I’m going to tell you something that’s going to make you laugh. Or has a stranger ever done something that you didn’t expect anyone to do for you? These moments happen because that person aligned with the language, attitude, and value of kindness.


When someone says something harsh or when we see evil things happening around in the world, this is a reminder that there are places in the world that still need kindness in the form of love, joy, and connection. There’s an abundance of kindness, and it’s up to you and me to share it with the world. 

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Here at The Hummingbird’s Journal blog you will always find inspiration & motivation to help you feel whole. You aren’t broken. You’re worthy of so much love and joy. Welcome.

7 thoughts on “On Showering the World with Kindness

  1. We always have choices to make in terms of how we carry out an action or deliver a message. Choosing to do something with kindness does not make us weak, and doesn’t make the recipient weak. Choosing to act with kindness in our hearts is never a poor choice and can make all the difference. Thank you for this post!
    Joan
    My Best Friend Adeline
    https://kindness-compassion-and-coaching.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Joan, for reading and commenting your thoughts! Yes, it makes all the difference to choose to act with kindness. I love how you point out that kindness isn’t weakness. I’ve been thinking lately that all we really need at the core is love and kindness is a perfect extension of it.

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  2. I’m a little bit conflicted about this one.
    I am all for being good. To yourself and to others.
    HOWEVER, I’ve seen the “kindness” label pop up quite a bit lately (it must be trending), and it is mostly used to scare away any negativity. First of all, some constructive criticism is not that bad. Maybe people just should develop a thicker skin rather than expect everyone to handle them with kids’ gloves. Kindness stems from goodness, but it can also mask evil sometimes. Do we really want that? Just to be kind?

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    1. I see what you mean. What type of negativity do you think kindness scares away? I totally agree that constructive criticism helps people grow and that kindness must stem from goodness not evil. I don’t completely agree with developing thick skin–as a way of not feeling what one is truly feeling, to become numb from feeling pain. For example, “someone hurt my feelings” and not letting oneself feel hurt. Thinking back to the moments in my life when I’ve had to develop thick skin, sometimes it was from painful experiences, experiences in which I started to believe that it was normal for people to always be angry and mean and hurt. In these experiences, instead of building thick skin, I wish I’d had the skill to be able to recognize other people’s hurt and pain, so that I could look at them with compassion versus hardening myself to the world. I agree with developing thick skin as a way of not taking things personally, working with the feedback one gets.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. A friend of mine recently told me how they don’t feel at home in the country they currently reside in. This was in regards to a debate on immigration. I was also told that no matter what the born and raised in that country will do, my friend will never feel at home in a country that THEY were not born and raised in. I merely pointed out that sometimes it is up to the individual and no matter how welcome others will try and make you feel. I was then told to be kind and the topic was closed.

        Developing a thick skin is not about going numb. It’s about being able to analyze outside words without developing to being hurt straight away.

        Liked by 1 person

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