What do you like least about teaching?

You probably have a lot of questions about what it means to be a teacher. You may be wondering if it’s a right fit for you. Is teaching challenging? The answer is yes.

If you were to ask me today, after 3 years of teaching, What do you like least about teaching?, I’d say teaching is time-consuming. There’s a solution to this. I just haven’t mastered it yet. 

I’ve struggled with teaching because I haven’t been in the same school or same grade level every year. Causing me to change curriculums and texts every time since each school and grade level requires something different. 

The first couple of years of teaching, I struggled with classroom management—making sure everyone was in their seat, paying attention, and being respectful while I taught a lesson.

Just when I thought I had teaching under control, I realized that lesson planning continued to be a struggle. I never seemed to have the lessons plans prepared weeks in advance. I always had them ready just on time. 

Not to mention that teaching during a pandemic has added more challenges because it required me to use different formats of learning and adjust to new guidelines such as for attendance and grading.

I wonder if after I accumulate enough lesson plans for different grade levels and stick with my current school, will the time-consuming aspect of teaching no longer be a problem since I’ll be better prepared? Only time will tell. 

What I want to leave you with is this, I think that my least favorite parts of teaching have always been the things that I haven’t mastered yet. And the solution for that is experience.  As the years go by, we have to opportunity to grow. If every year you work on improving a specific area in your teaching, the next year you can focus on something else. 

He has the formula to being memorable

“If you could have one superpower, what superpower would you choose?” she asked. I thought about it for a moment. What would you have answered?

I was expecting the usual interview question like “What are your strengths and weaknesses?” or “What makes you the best candidate for this job?”. Out of all interview questions I’ve ever been asked, the superpower question is one of the most memorable ones.

I wonder, what makes a thing or a person memorable? Is there a formula to being memorable?  

David Sedaris is a very memorable, interesting person (in addition to being a humor writer). The first time I watched David Sedaris being interviewed, I was hooked with his persona and wanted to learn more about him.

I watched one of his interviews because I heard that he’s a funny writer. I was actually in search for another formula, the how-to-be-funny formula. 

In an interview, Stephen Colbert asks David what life wisdom he’s going to share with a graduating class. David’s life wisdom: be cautious of the scented candles you buy because only a couple scented candles are worth buying. (Both are French brands which I’d never heard about.)

Before he answered, I was expecting a serious message of wisdom. Then I realized that despite his answer not being serious or expected, it’s true advice. It reminded me of candles I’ve bought in the past that didn’t live up to their expectations.

David has the formula to being memorable. He gives out-of-ordinary answers and asks out-of-ordinary questions. If there’s a formula to being memorable, it’s to be unexpected + different.

What’s the most memorable question that you’ve ever been asked? If you’ve read David’s books, do you have any recs? I’m still deciding what book of his to read first.

Your amiga, 

Andrea