All posts tagged: ada limon

There are Ghosts and Madness in These Lines

This is a poetry series in which I share poetry lines that move me and why they move me. The following lines are from The Carrying by Ada Limon. What if I want to go devil instead? Bow down to the madness that makes me. from “Last Summer After a Panic Attack” I think that all artists including writers carry a madness. (Correct me if I’m wrong.) Here, I’m using the either the “state of frenzied or chaotic activity” definition or “extremely foolish behavior.” My madness sometimes occurs after midnight when I can’t sleep and there’s chaos in my mind. A whirlwind of writing ideas and dreams. Unanswered messages like ghosts in the throat. from “Last Summer After a Panic Attack” I have never thought of ghosts living in the throat, and I admire this line so much for its creativity. I would have expected ghosts in the attic or ghosts in the cemetery, so the end of this line caught me off guard. It reminds me of the things I don’t say when I need …

A Spiritual Maturity & Grandeur

I was standing in front of an arrangement of roses with my uncle. We’d been in the dining room when I asked him if he had a simple piece of advice for me to find inner peace. When we stood in front of these flowers, he started telling me something important about the reason flowers need watering. But I did not let him finish his train of thought because I started crying. To give you some context, I hadn’t seen my uncle in more than five years (since the last time I visited Mexico. I was a teenager then.). In his interactions with me and our family, his presence emitted, what I’ll call, a spiritual grandeur. In the words of Ada Limon, “I env[ied], I env[ied] that.” I wanted his spiritual grandeur, so I braved myself and asked him for spiritual advice.

On Moons & Poetry

Lately, I’ve been thinking about realities. Right now variations of the quote, “You are not in this world. The world is inside you” come to mind. And this is where the image of the moon comes in. Poet Natalie Diaz in conversation with Mike Albo said that one of her brothers who is addicted to meth sometimes hides from the moon because he thinks it’s hunting him. This image of a grown man running away from the beautiful moon seems unbelievable to me. But it’s true. She later gives poets a piece of writing advice: you can start with an image. Since watching her poetry reading and interview for the PEN DIY: How To Series, the image of the moon, the image of a moon lingers in my mind. I think of her letter poem “From the Desire Field” addressed to Ada Limon, also a poet. Diaz writes, “I’ll risk losing something new instead— / like you lost your rosen moon, shook it lose.”