All posts tagged: first-year teacher

What do you like least about teaching?

You probably have a lot of questions about what it means to be a teacher. You may be wondering if it’s a right fit for you. Is teaching challenging? The answer is yes. If you were to ask me today, after 3 years of teaching, What do you like least about teaching?, I’d say teaching is time-consuming. There’s a solution to this. I just haven’t mastered it yet.  I’ve struggled with teaching because I haven’t been in the same school or same grade level every year. Causing me to change curriculums and texts every time since each school and grade level requires something different.  The first couple of years of teaching, I struggled with classroom management—making sure everyone was in their seat, paying attention, and being respectful while I taught a lesson. Just when I thought I had teaching under control, I realized that lesson planning continued to be a struggle. I never seemed to have the lessons plans prepared weeks in advance. I always had them ready just on time.  Not to mention that …

My Least Favorite Part About Being a Teacher

As an aspiring poet, I wanted to become alluring. As a teacher-to-be, I soon figured out that the mystery within allure does not help the teacher. As I teach, I gravitate toward speaking sentences that will help set an atmosphere of connectivity. Mystery in the education setting creates barriers and misunderstandings. My humanity is behind my mystery, and students need to be able to see that. To get my students’ attention, I usually ask them questions that will allow them to share their experiences. I’ll ask questions like the following. Who has been bullied? Who has bullied? Who has witnessed a classmate be bullied? I want them to see that they have similarities. And if they don’t, I want them to learn from each other’s experiences about things that have been unexplained to them such as why do students bully.

First-Year Teaching Advice: The Best Piece of Advice

I remember the worries I felt before I started my teaching internship. Would students like me? Would students be smarter than me? Would I be able to manage all the tasks required of a teacher such as turning in grades and weekly less plans on time, attend all faculty meetings, and have enough energy and patience to teach six classes that for the most are back to back. The answer to all of these questions became yes. If I could go back in time, and give myself only one piece of advice for my first-year teaching it would be to show up with my best attitude and put in my best effort. Back then I would have probably said, What if I don’t have years of experience? What if a student rebels and refuses to follow classroom rules? What happens if I don’t turn in grades or lesson plans on time? Even though all of these scenarios happened to me, I learned from them, and I moved on.